Category Archives: Assignment 3

Assignment 3 – Tutor Feedback

My tutor’s first comments within her feedback for my Assignment 3 were:-

‘You have put a lot of work into this assignment and I think your evaluation comments are very accurate. I agree where you say that the series does not seem to be very coherent. However, what is coherent is the diary. This I think is the main piece of the assignment with the photographs as illustrations and not the other way around.’

As a result of the feedback I changed the way I presented the assignment when I added it for final submission as part of this blog. 

I submitted Assignment 2 on 29 November and submitted Assignment 3 on 31 May 2017 and in the meantime I had several months’ break from OCA study after my mum passed away. The delay was also partly due to me struggling with this particular assignment.

Other than the suggestion regarding the placement of the photographs, the tutor did not give me any other specific advice on the  content so I felt limited in understanding what I would need to change to improve it in time for submission, and therefore did not attempt to redo this assignment.

As part of the feedback for Assignment 3 however, my tutor did advise on Assignments 4 and 5 in terms of timing (as I was concerned that I would be too late to start the third level one course if I left things too much longer).  She critiqued my exercises and commented on exhibitions I had attended and added to the blog.

My tutor also suggested that I look at an article entitled ‘Comfort Zones’ by Russell Squires.  One of the key lessons I’ve learnt from reading the article is that failure is almost a necessary part of development as a photographer – there is an emphasis on experimentation and reflection being almost a cyclical exercise from which you can gradually improve. The quote from the article to retain and reflect upon is probably:-

 ‘When you undertake a new project, try not to create and define your comfort zone, look upon the unfamiliar as experience not yet gained, challenge yourself and your work will lead to exciting and new directions’. 

Assignment 3 – Research – Inspiring Self-portraits

FlickR is a rich source of imaginative self-portraits so it was useful to rifle through some websites which had selected some of the best creative ‘selfies’ to kick start me off on generating some ideas for the assignment. Many used photo-editing techniques to brilliant effect, such as this image entitled ‘Disagreement’ by Petri Damsten (https://www.flickr.com/photos/pdamsten/25554845560/in/dateposted/), depicting the struggle that besets us when temptation strikes…

Petri Damsten1

Similarly this image ‘Confused self’ by Adele Firth (https://www.flickr.com/photos/afirth/6014503963/in/dateposted/)….

Adele Firth (FlickR)

…. uses equally nifty post-production techniques and appeals to me more when you read her predicament in her caption: ‘Self portrait taken on a day when I was full of energy and different emotions and feeling very frustrated with myself!!! I knew I wanted to do something creative but I couldn’t pin down in my mind how I felt or what I was wanting to do which resulted in a whole heap of frustration and mixed emotions (all of which were captured on camera!).’ 

Some of the images make clever use of reflections – a relatively easy way to capture yourself without the hassle of setting up a tripod, camera release etc., and its the abstraction of the layers of reflection that make the photograph interesting as in these examples by Mario Mancuso (https://www.flickr.com/photos/mario-mancuso/25664114314/) and Jason Rufus (https://www.flickr.com/photos/jasonrufus/5339263157/)

Mario Mancuso (FlickR)

Jason Rufus (Flickr)

Some photographs just made me smile; there is something about the self-deprecating nature of these images which instantly attract me and warm me to the character, such as these images by Jason Travis (https://www.flickr.com/photos/jasontravis/14581782416/in/album-72157622601844079/) and Paul Stevenson (https://www.flickr.com/photos/pss/4876189045/)

Jason Travis (FlickR)

Paul Stevenson (FlickR)